TIF student sees bright future despite obstacles

ELDA HERNANDEZ AND JHULFRANCE JOSEPH

ELDA HERNANDEZ AND JHULFRANCE JOSEPH

by Steven Kissinger

Jhulfrance Joseph, a 21-year-old freshman at Florida SouthWestern State College, says she was aware that her college experience would require a lot of dedication and determination: After all, there was a time when she couldn’t see herself making it here at all.

When she graduated from Immokalee High School in 2013, she was unable to pass the ACT and FCAT, so she didn’t receive a standard high school diploma. Joseph was devastated and lost any hope of going to college. With no money and no job, things for Joseph seemed bleak.

She first reached out to Barbara Van Essen with the Girl Scouts of Southwest Florida. Van Essen helped her deal with everything she was going through, even assisting her in enrolling at the Immokalee Technical Center, known as iTech, so she could begin taking classes to earn her GED.

While she enjoyed iTech, Joseph admits she was impatient. She was anxious to receive her GED so she could move forward with her life. As a junior in high school, she had become involved with The Immokalee Foundation, first as a tutor in the Immokalee Readers program and then by joining the Career Development program her senior year.

Through the CDP, students enhance the professional skills necessary to become confident, productive and successful citizens. CDP guides them through the process of career goal-setting and attainment, bringing together outstanding career development services, best practices, educational career panels, job shadowing and internships. The program also provides tuition and scholarships, arranges job shadowing/internship and apprenticeship positions, evaluates students’ career interest inventories, and provides opportunities to attend career fairs.

Joseph approached Elda Hernandez, TIF’s Career Development program manager. “I told her I wanted to get my GED faster,” said Joseph. “She searched and found a program at Michigan State University that helps students like me.”

TIF not only paid for Joseph to attend MSU, but Hernandez also helped prepare her for a new environment and different weather. “I was so thankful TIF gave me the opportunity to experience something out of my comfort zone. I was there less than a month, and once I received my GED, I started to see a new future for myself. It gave me hope.”

Now, in her first year of college, she remembers the excitement and eagerness of wanting to have a better education and success. But, she recognizes it is certainly different, and more difficult, than high school. For instance, college requires more preparation for the material that is given by the professors. “An academic challenge I faced is time management,” Joseph explained.

“It was difficult to accomplish two to four hours of reading and preparation for the entire course. When I did not have a job, the extra time was extremely beneficial because I would have all my assignments completed. However, now that I have a job, managing my time wisely is my first priority. I work to overcome my academic challenges by working on making them into strong attributes.”

As for her future, it is definitely bright. Joseph has known since high school – when TIF provided her with the opportunity to shadow nurses and doctors – that she wanted to be an obstetrician/gynecologist. She is grateful for TIF’s part in helping her on the path toward achieving her goals.

“Everyone at TIF is friendly and they care about you,” Joseph said. “They want you to succeed. They’ve taught me to be stronger for myself and my education.”

The Immokalee Foundation provides a range of education programs that focus on building pathways to success through college and post-secondary preparation and support, mentoring and tutoring, opportunities for broadening experiences and life skills development leading to economic independence.

To learn more about TIF, volunteering as a mentor or for additional information, call 239.430.9122 or visit www.immokaleefoundation.org.

Steven Kissinger, executive director of The Immokalee Foundation, can be reached at steven.kissinger@immokaleefoundation.com

Double Vision: CCSO’S 2 HELICOPTERS GET CAMERA UPGRADE

The Wescam MX-10 thermal imaging system houses two cameras. A color camera used primarily during the day can read an object the size of a license plate from more than 750 feet away. The second camera, an infrared thermal imager, can be used during the day and at night. Infrared technology permits the flight crew to see objects that may otherwise go undetected at night.

The Wescam MX-10 thermal imaging system houses two cameras. A color camera used primarily during the day can read an object the size of a license plate from more than 750 feet away. The second camera, an infrared thermal imager, can be used during the day and at night. Infrared technology permits the flight crew to see objects that may otherwise go undetected at night.

An aerial video shot from a Collier County Sheriff’s Office helicopter shows deputies making their way through a heavily wooded area in Golden Gate Estates.

The images of the deputies, viewed through the helicopter’s infrared imaging system, are bright white and surrounded by darkness as they step through overgrowth to reach a 47-year-old man with Down syndrome who went missing after wandering from his home in the 2600 block of Desoto Boulevard on July 14, 2014.

Even though they couldn’t see it, the deputies in the woods were headed toward a burst of white captured on the helicopter’s camera. Two deputies in the helicopter guided those on the ground to the burst of white – where they located Paul Charles Gunther.

It’s just one example of CCSO successfully using the enhanced thermal imaging cameras onboard the agency’s two helicopters to solve a case.

The new camera is lighter and smaller than the previous camera system. The small size and low weight allow the ball-shaped camera to be placed at the tip of the nose of the aircraft rather than under the belly, offering the crew an unobstructed view.

The new camera is lighter and smaller than the previous camera system. The small size and low weight allow the ball-shaped camera to be placed at the tip of the nose of the aircraft rather than under the belly, offering the crew an unobstructed view.

The Wescam MX-10 high-definition and infrared cameras were installed last year, marking the first major upgrade to Air1 and Air2 in about six years, said Lt. Mark Cherney, chief pilot for the CCSO Aviation Unit.

“The Wescam MX-10 cameras played a pivotal role in locating Mr. Gunther in that we will never know if he would have been able to make it safely back home on his own,” Lt. Cherney said.

Because the MX-10 employs a much higher quality focal plane array within the thermal camera, Lt. Cherney said, discerning Gunther from the background environment made detection much more likely than had the agency been using the previous cameras, which were older and outdated.

The cameras replaced two Wescam 12TS200 model cameras that were about six years old. One of the cameras suffered mechanical failure and the other was failing, said Cherney, noting the average lifespan for thermal imaging cameras is five years.

A screen grab from video taken from a high-definition camera onboard a Collier County Sheriff’s Office helicopter shows the moment three deputies found a 47-year-old man with Down syndrome who wandered away from his home in July 2014. Deputies in the sky guided deputies on the ground to the man’s location after the camera’s infrared thermal imaging system detected a heat signature in dense woods near the man’s residence in Golden Gate Estates. CCSO photo.

A screen grab from video taken from a high-definition camera onboard a Collier County Sheriff’s Office helicopter shows the moment three deputies found a 47-year-old man with Down syndrome who wandered away from his home in July 2014. Deputies in the sky guided deputies on the ground to the man’s location after the camera’s infrared thermal imaging system detected a heat signature in dense woods near the man’s residence in Golden Gate Estates. CCSO photo.

The new technology allows deputies in the sky to catch fleeing suspects and find lost persons quicker.

At 37 pounds and 14 inches tall, the MX-10 is lighter and smaller than the 12TS200. The small size and low weight allow the ball-shaped camera to be placed at the tip of the nose of the aircraft rather than under the belly, offering an unobstructed view. Prior to the MX-10 installation, pilots were required to maneuver the skid gear out of the picture during orbits around a target.

The camera system provides the helicopter crew with high-definition video as well as thermal imagery. It’s integrated into a mapping system that provides a 3-D overlay of the mapping data over the image for road information, and gives the option of adding local data from the agency’s geographic information system (GIS) for Collier County. It also has topographic mapping for search and rescue loaded into it.

The gyro-stabilized camera calculates the GPS coordinates of whatever it is looking at, and those coordinates are overlaid onto the map. So if crew members locate a person or object from the air, the camera will tell them the precise coordinates of what they have found.

The camera can also lock onto those coordinates so the pilot can maneuver the helicopter around the area for a better angle, but the camera will automatically remain aimed at the target. During a flight, the pilot controls the helicopter while a tactical flight officer operates the surveillance equipment.

The biggest difference is the infrared camera, Cherney said.

A Collier County Sheriff’s Office Aviation crew flies over Marco Island using a high-tech camera system. The recently added technology allow deputies in the sky to catch fleeing suspects and find lost persons quicker. Photo(s) by Cpl. Efrain Hernandez/CCSO

A Collier County Sheriff’s Office Aviation crew flies over Marco Island using a high-tech camera system. The recently added technology allow deputies in the sky to catch fleeing suspects and find lost persons quicker. Photo(s) by Cpl. Efrain Hernandez/CCSO

Even with slight temperature variations, infrared or thermal imaging technology permits the flight crew to see objects that may otherwise go undetected at night. This allows the flight crew to locate criminals who don’t want to be found or people who are lost and don’t know where they are.

The area where Gunther was ultimately located had been searched multiple times early on to no avail, indicating he had been mobile during the search, moving in and out of areas that had been previously cleared, said Lt. Cherney.

Some 24 hours into the search the flight crew decided to reinitiate the search from the beginning and completely re-searched the area that had been previously searched and cleared. The CCSO helicopter, using the Wescam MX-10 camera, located a heat signature and the crew directed three deputies on the ground to a location in the heavily wooded area.

“They located Mr. Gunther sitting with crossed legs in a very small remote clearing some 200 yards behind his residence in very dense woods,” Lt. Cherney said.

The CCSO Aviation Unit has been using infrared camera technology since 1996. The new cameras mark the fourth upgrade to the infrared technology.

The Aviation Unit is made up of four full-time pilots, including Cherney. All are trained to use the new technology.

CCSO helicopters fly law enforcement missions every day. The 1971 Bell OH-58 military surplus helicopters are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, Cherney said.

Searches for missing persons, fleeing criminals and crime suppression patrols – saturating targeted areas with high-visibility patrols based on crime trend data – make up an estimated 80 percent of all aviation missions, Cherney said.

During the six years the helicopters had the 12TS200 cameras, the Aviation Unit located 123 missing people and assisted with 217 felony arrests and 100 misdemeanor arrests.

The Aviation Unit has located 16 missing people and assisted with 27 felony arrests since Jan. 15, 2014, when the MX-10s took flight.

Local law enforcement agencies greeted the new technology with enthusiasm.

Assistant Chief David Baer of the Marco Island Police Department said the department frequently taps CCSO’s Aviation Unit for assistance in finding missing children, seniors and boaters as well as fleeing suspects.

“I think the enhanced technology is fantastic,” said Assistant Chief Baer. “It enhances our abilities and will make Marco Island and all of Collier County a safer place.”

Hard Hat Tour and reception

Naming donors for the BPEI at Naples Building Campaign: From Left: Mr. & Mrs. Andy Cummins, Dr. Stephen G. Schwartz, Medical Director, BPEI at Naples, Dr. & Mrs. Beauchamp, Mr. & Mrs. Richard Lewis, Mrs. R. Gozon, Mrs. Colleen Murphy & Paul Skapura, Mr. & Mrs. G. McDonough, Dr. Eduardo C. Alfonso, Director & Chairman BPEI, Dr. Pascal J. Goldschmidt, Senior VP Medical Affairs & Dean UM Miller School of Medicine

Naming donors for the BPEI at Naples Building Campaign: From Left: Mr. & Mrs. Andy Cummins, Dr. Stephen G. Schwartz, Medical Director, BPEI at Naples, Dr. & Mrs.
Beauchamp, Mr. & Mrs. Richard Lewis, Mrs. R. Gozon, Mrs. Colleen Murphy & Paul Skapura, Mr. & Mrs. G. McDonough, Dr. Eduardo C. Alfonso, Director & Chairman BPEI,
Dr. Pascal J. Goldschmidt, Senior VP Medical Affairs & Dean UM Miller School of Medicine

More than 250 friends and supporters of Bascom Palmer Eye Institute attended a “Hard Hat Tour” and reception at Bascom Palmer’s new eye center under construction on Tamiami Trail in Naples on Thursday, March 19, 2015.

Wearing hard hats through the construction site, people walked through what will be a $25 million, 20,000 square-foot, state of the art eye care center. Located at the intersection of US-41 and Cypress Woods Drive, across the street from Park Shore Drive, the two-story eye center will open in June, 2015.

Ten years ago, Bascom Palmer opened the only university-based eye care center in Southwest Florida—a leased, 3,000 square foot office located in Naples Community Hospital’s NCH Medical Plaza. Opened primarily to diagnose and treat retinal and macular diseases, the practice has grown considerably in size and scope.

When the new center opens, it will provide more than six times the current amount of clinical space for the treatment of virtually all eye diseases, including macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataracts, and pediatric eye disorders. The additional space will allow Bascom Palmer to expand the number of clinical research trials offered to patients. On-site surgery will also be available in an ambulatory surgery center that will open on the second floor.

Eduardo C. Alfonso, M.D., Director and Chairman, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Ms. Shelia Davis, Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., Senior VP Medical Affairs & Dean University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Eduardo C. Alfonso, M.D., Director and Chairman, Bascom
Palmer Eye Institute, Ms. Shelia Davis, Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D.,
Senior VP Medical Affairs & Dean University of Miami Miller
School of Medicine

“In addition to being ranked the #1 eye hospital in the nation for the past 11 years by U.S. News & World Report, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute is also known for its exceptional vision research and its outstanding medical education,” said Pascal Goldschmidt, M.D., senior vice president for medical affairs and dean of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. “Many of the world’s advances in ophthalmology have taken place at Bascom Palmer. And, more than 37 graduates of Bascom Palmer’s training programs have become ophthalmology department chairmen of medical schools and teaching hospitals throughout the world.”

Stephen G. Schwartz, M.D., M.B.A., medical director of Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at Naples, welcomed the guests to Bascom Palmer’s new home in Naples. “When other people travel all over to find world-class medical care – you won’t have to,” he said. “Bascom Palmer is coming to you.”

Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., Senior VP Medical Affairs & Dean University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Frances Wolfson, UM Trustee Emeritus

Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., Senior VP Medical Affairs
& Dean University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Frances Wolfson, UM Trustee Emeritus

“The physicians at Bascom Palmer are fueled by the notion that each patient we diagnose and treat is a life changed for the better,” said Eduardo C. Alfonso, M.D., chairman of Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. “Bascom Palmer’s doctors partner with our scientists and researchers who are using the latest technology, including stem cell research and gene therapy, to find treatments that can be personalized for each person suffering from vision loss. Much of what we do and learn will take place right here in Naples.”

A large amount of the building has been funded through the generosity of foundations or families living in the Naples community. Alfonso said that additional opportunities to support the building campaign and become a partner in the Institute’s sight-saving mission are available.

A Great Place for Philanthropy

 Jim Henderson President of William C. Huff Companies and national speaker for estate downsizing and lifestyle transitions

Jim Henderson
President of William C. Huff Companies and national speaker for estate downsizing and lifestyle transitions

Naples is a great place when it comes to philanthropy. According to the National Center on Charitable Statistics there are 357 public charities and 350 private foundations in Collier County. When I say it’s a privilege to have a business in such a community-minded area, I sincerely mean it from the bottom of my heart.

Our company has had the privilege to assist many of them. Often, we participate in walks/runs and other times we lend our services to transport items needed to help set-up galas or auctions. Since taking over William C. Huff Companies 27 years ago, it’s been our company philosophy to give back. We believe that this has made a huge impact, not just in the lives of people in need, but most profoundly in the lives of our staff and indeed, me.

Often times we give just to say we helped. And, then there are those times when something grabs you and you give from the heart. It doesn’t really matter if it’s time, money or resources — giving from the heart always seems to have the most dramatic impact.

A few years ago I was approached to be a sponsor for a Friends of Foster Children (FFC) fundraising event. As I intently listened to how the organization was helping foster children receive tutoring and educational mentoring, I, for the first time in my adult life, came face to face with my own at-risk childhood — one of abuse, neglect and living in foster homes in Northern Maine. It was then that I realized that I had to do more than just “give back” — I had to be a part of this organization and use my experiences to help educate the community about this often overlooked group of children.

For the past three-plus years, I have had the opportunity to be on the Friends of Foster Children Board of Directors. What I have seen transpire is nothing short of miraculous. We’ve brought passionate people onto the board who give from their heart; they offer time and resources that will help provide a better life for at-risk children in Southwest Florida. I’m excited about the future and for the many young lives that the FFC helps.

When it comes to “giving back” – we all know that’s the right thing to do. However, when it comes from the heart, lives can and will be transformed.

Nole & Napoleon

Tennis RacketsTwo rather seasoned tennis players in Naples were having a conversation recently, when one of them stated: “Twenty years ago, I could have beaten Novak Djokovic.” To which the other remarked: “Yeah, he was only seven years old then.”

It is a point well made; because even a player of Djokovic’s stature had to learn the game at some point; which brings us to the subject of junior tennis.

At the Arthur L. Allen Tennis Center in Cambier Park there is year-round instruction available for aspiring young players. It starts with the after school program in August, which runs through the entire school year. Kids aged 4 & up can hone their game Monday through Thursday from 4:00 – 5:30 p.m.

tennis playersWhen school lets out in June, the summer camp begins. There are two options available in this Monday through Friday program: “Tennis Only” which runs from 9 a.m. – Noon and the “Tennis Plus” which is from 9 a.m.– 3 p.m. and includes other fun activities in addition to the tennis instruction.

What is the point of all this instruction, you may ask? Well, one very exciting avenue for young players is junior tournament tennis. Here at Cambier Park we host 10 junior tournaments throughout the year.

These USTA – sanctioned events provide a training ground for the professionals of the future.

This would seem to be a thing of great benefit. For as Wellington said (or didn’t say) of his victory over Napoleon “The battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton.”

Turning Loss Into Action

CORE STUDENTS FROM PALMETTO RIDGE HIGH SCHOOL MAKE A DUI PROMISE STANDING NEXT TO THE CAR IN WHICH MEAGAN NAPIER WAS KILLED.

CORE STUDENTS FROM PALMETTO RIDGE HIGH SCHOOL MAKE A DUI PROMISE STANDING NEXT TO THE CAR IN WHICH MEAGAN NAPIER WAS KILLED.

More than 400 local supporters turned out for an unforgettable presentation at Drug Free Collier’s 7th Annual Fundraising Luncheon on Thursday, March 5, 2015 at the Ritz Carlton Golf Resort.

Attendees at this year’s luncheon were moved by the stories of each speaker and pledged their support to protect local children from substance abuse.

“Today our young people are making choices that will define their future and the health and safety of the next generation. Too many of us have been touched by a young life cut short or a future destroyed by substance abuse,” said Mimi Scofield, Drug Free Collier Board Member and Event Chair.

“Through prevention and education Drug Free Collier is empowering our kids to make safe and healthy choices in their formative years by teaching them the power of choice,” she added.

MICHELLE BORDERS SHARES THE HEARTFELT STORY THAT INSPIRED HER TO GET INVOLVED WITH DRUG FREE COLLIER.

MICHELLE BORDERS SHARES THE HEARTFELT STORY
THAT INSPIRED HER TO GET INVOLVED WITH DRUG FREE COLLIER.

This year’s program featured a powerful DUI presentation by The Meagan Napier Foundation. Renee Napier founded the organization after losing her daughter to a drunk driver in 2002. Her story gained national attention after she forgave the convicted drunk driver and even campaigned to have his sentence reduced. Eric Smallridge, no longer in prison, now joins Napier in speaking to audiences everywhere about the real impact of his decision to drink and drive. By teaming up, they are working to save lives.

“I had some of my son’s friends at the table and they were significantly impacted by the message and the meaningful presentation of a community coming together for such a worthy cause,” said Amy Turner, Co-Owner of Ooh La La! Jewels Du Jour.

Attendees also heard from Michelle Borders, a local businesswoman and member of Drug Free Collier, along with her son, Nick Borders.

They spoke about the tragic loss of a young friend to a drug overdose and how they joined Drug Free Collier to work on local solutions to protect children from substance abuse.

VEORA LITTLE IS RECOGNIZED FOR HER ROLE AS VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR OF OPERATION MEDICINE CABINET.

VEORA LITTLE IS RECOGNIZED FOR HER ROLE AS VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR OF OPERATION MEDICINE CABINET.

The program also included a special recognition of Veora Little, Volunteer Coordinator of Drug Free Collier’s Operation Medicine Cabinet®. Little and a group of dedicated volunteers have worked tirelessly to raise awareness about the safe use, storage and disposal of household medication. Her involvement began in 2006 after several local elementary students were transported to the hospital after taking Xanax pills given to them by another student. She recognized that something needed to be done to keep this from happening again and volunteered to spearhead Operation Medicine Cabinet. Today, there are now 11 permanent drop boxes in Collier County where residents can safely dispose of unwanted medication.

“All of the stories that were shared at this year’s luncheon, point to the tragic consequences of substance abuse and clearly show us that we each have the power to make a difference through the choices that we make,” said Melanie Black, Executive Director of Drug Free Collier.

The luncheon generated critical funding to support our school based prevention clubs known as the CORE Society. “The generous response from our community provides local teens with the encouragement they need to continue changing teen perceptions about drug and alcohol use,” Black said. “We are grateful for the strong support of our sponsors and especially thank Mayor John Sorey and Patrick Nolan for their roles in making our event a huge success,” she said.

“We’ve made some real progress, but there’s still more work to do,” added Black. To get involved or to learn more about Drug Free Collier, visit www.DrugFreeCollier.org or call 239.377.0535.

Is it time to Upgrade?

It is almost taken for granted these days that you are eligible for a new cell phone every two years, and many people take advantage of this generous ‘offer’ from cell phone service providers. But how often should other technology equipment be upgraded? Certainly we do not consider replacing our televisions or computers every two years, so I will attempt to establish some guidelines for when you should consider upgrading your equipment.

cell phonesCELL PHONES

Features and size are the biggest selling points of cell phones, and as features increase the size gets smaller. The latest trend is for larger screens on very thin phones. For comparison, the top of the line iPhone sold in 2007 was priced at $599 for 8GB of storage, the current iPhone 6 has 128GB of storage for $399, and camera resolution has increased from 2MP to 8MP in that time. Common features offered today like finger print authentication and motion-tracking were not even options that were available eight years ago when the first iPhone was introduced.

If your cell phone is still a ‘flip-phone,’ you may want to consider upgrading to a ‘smart phone’ where you will benefit from features such as text messaging, email and web browsing that are now common to all carriers and models. Your monthly bill may increase by just $10 or $20, and you will find that is money well spent.

printerPRINTERS

It seems that printers now fall into two categories: those workhorses that seem to last forever (which is now anything longer than five years,) and those that last only two or three years before needing replacement. A printer that cost $300 two years ago may go for $150 today, plus have lots of features the older model lacks. If your printer is reporting low paper or a paper jam when neither is occurring, it could be a failed sensor. In cases like this, it’s better to replace than repair. You can be almost certain that your new printer will not use the same ink as your old one, so if you have the convenience of waiting until your current ink supply runs out, by all means do so before getting a new printer that
uses different ink! In my experience, most inkjet printers sold today have a useful life of three of four years before an error or hardware failure deems replacement necessary.

computerCOMPUTERS

This is a common question. How do you know if your computer is ‘old’? The most common sign, slowness, may be easily and economically fixed by simply adding more memory (RAM) to your machine. Go to crucial.com to find available memory upgrades for your computer. Other signs that your computer is aging is an outdated operating system, which will prevents some newer programs and even web sites from functioning on your computer. Often an operating system update will solve these woes. If your computer hardware is not capable of adding memory or upgrading the operating system, it is time to consider replacing it. Computers are becoming faster, more efficient and less expensive every year, so there is never a bad time to upgrade your machine.

cameraCAMERAS

Many of the features offered by the next-generation cameras are not used by most amateur photographers. Sixty-one compared to nine possible focal points are not necessarily useful if you consistently use auto-focus. A frame rate of six frames per second compared to three frames per second is useful, perhaps, if you are shooting a rapidly changing subject like a bird in flight or kids jumping into a pool, but you do not need six (or even three) identical photographs of a rock formation or a bouquet of flowers.

Many photographers recommend putting your purchasing power into lenses, especially ones that you can hold on to and use down the line.

streaming tvTELEVISIONS

It seems that many of the newest TV features are not often adapted by the majority of manufacturers. Remember the 3D craze of a few years ago? How many people do you know that keep three or four pairs of 3D glasses near their TV? Most of the newer TV sets sold today are ‘Smart TVs’ that can connect to your home network to offer content such as Netflix and Hulu as well as other entertainment sources through a device such as an AppleTV or Roku.

These devices often need an HDMI connection, which is a combined digital audio-video cable that can transmit today’s HD signals from cable TV, media boxes and Blu-Ray players. To use these features, you may need to upgrade your TV set.

Whether you are considering upgrading your computer, television or cell phone, decide when you are ready, do the research and then buy it immediately. If you wait around for ‘the next thing’, you will never replace it!

Jeff Bohr
Naples Mac Help
239.595.0482 | jeff@jeffbohr.com

Who are the Hungarians?

Hungarian Flagby Diane Halas

Hungarians are a highly literate group of people from the heart of Europe. They call themselves “Magyar” after the most prominent Hungarian tribes in the decisive invasion of 896.

These horsemen, the Manicha-Er or Megyer, were initially a group of seven tribes from the Urals and the steppes of eastern Asia. They were joined later by three Turkic tribes becoming ten – the Ten Arrows or the“On-ogur.” It is likely that the name “Hungary” evolved from the name of this coalition.

Hungarian ChurchThe horsemen deposed the rulers of the area and moved into the lowlands of the Carpathian Basin along two primary rivers the Danube and the Tisza – and their tributaries. There they continued a semi-nomadic lifestyle. Over the next 100 or so years, they settled into the Basin and around 1000 CE, they established a Christian monarchy, the Kingdom of Hungary, under St. Stephen. These people shaped the languages which became Hungary’s native tongue.

Part of the Uralic language group, it shares few characteristics with other language. Other group members are confined to Finns and Estonians. Hungarian has no Germanic or Latin origins. Its original and unique alphabet was abandoned in favor of Latin script around the time of St. Stephen.

The Kingdom of Hungary played an important part in the Holy Roman Empire. Its borders were extensive. Its position in the center of the breadbasket of Europe made it a frequent target of invaders. In modern times, forced out of their own country at intervals by war, politics, and poverty and motivated by a compelling desire to achieve, Hungarians have sought out new homes around the world. Where they settle, they bring their culture, their talents, their values, and their drive.

THE HUNGARIAN BAGPIPE BAND “HUNGARIAN BAGPIPE ENSEMBLE” PARADES ON THE 21TH INTERNATIONAL BAGPIPE FESTIVAL PHOTO CREDIT: ALEXANDR JUNEK IMAGING S.R.O..

THE HUNGARIAN BAGPIPE BAND “HUNGARIAN BAGPIPE ENSEMBLE” PARADES ON THE 21TH INTERNATIONAL BAGPIPE FESTIVAL PHOTO CREDIT: ALEXANDR JUNEK IMAGING S.R.O..

It is said that although Hungarians look like everyone else, their DNA sometimes gains them the label of the “Martians among us.”

Hungarians love their cuisine. When it comes to eating, Hungarians seem to have no natural bounds. They are omnivorous, adventurous, and hearty eaters with a penchant for the deep redolent flavors of red wines and paprika, garlic, and sour cream. Their desserts make up in nuts and poppy seeds what they lack in sugar. Hungarian emotions run deep and strong – if you are married to one, you know. They talk a lot and all at once. Hungarians have a great love for their music from Liszt to Bartok and Kodaly to Black Friday. Hearty and adventurous, they live life fully.

The Hungarian diaspora started just before World War I. It proceeded in earnest after the Treaty of Trianon in 1921, which dismantled the Kingdom of Hungary. It increased with the displacements of World War II, the Russian invasion, and the ill-fated 1956 Hungarian Revolution. These events drove many Hungarians to the United States. Naples benefited from the arrival of some of these transplants who have made Southwest Florida their home.

Hungarian CastleHungarian families began to arrive in Naples even before the major influx of the late 1940s. The first arrivals were close-knit, meeting in each other’s homes to share ethnic food, their culture, and their language. By the 1960s, the community was large. A common gathering place was the home of Juliana and Andreas Koda where ample food and Christian fellowship were always available. A small Hungarian-American club had organized in Golden Gate but participation dwindled and died out as the original organizers aged. However, the Hungarian community in Naples continued to grow.

Prominent among the earliest Hungarian arrivals was Ed Frank, a Naples pioneer and first generation American. Ed was born of Hungarian parents. His father reportedly worked his passage to North America in the boiler room of a ship. The family migrated to California. Their life wasn’t easy. Ed left home to seek opportunity and came across country to Florida arriving in the early 1920s.

Out of money, he decided to settle here. Hard work allowed him to open an early auto repair garage, now replicated in the Naples Depot Museum. Frank is credited with inventing the swamp buggy and starting the swamp buggy races.

DANCERS IN TRADITIONAL COSTUME PERFORM A FOLK DANCE PROGRAM DURING THE FESTIVAL OF FOLK ARTS. PHOTO CREDIT: ANNTO

DANCERS IN TRADITIONAL COSTUME PERFORM A FOLK DANCE PROGRAM DURING THE FESTIVAL OF FOLK ARTS. PHOTO CREDIT: ANNTO

According to an anecdotal story from Juliana Koda, Frank and others including Margit and Joseph Toth, also first generation Hungarian – Americans, pooled their ready money ($15) to open a bank. The nearest one was in Ft. Myers and inconvenient for the growing local economy. An elderly and childless Hungarian man offered them an empty 5th Avenue barn to house the bank.

They painted it and put up a sign asking others to join them. Soon they accepted from their first customer a deposit of $5. Other deposits followed and within that year they had over $200 on deposit. The bank they founded – the Bank of Naples – hired experienced bank personnel – R. Clarence and Mamie Tooke- as manager and head cashier. Ed served as Vice-President for many years. The bank thrived.

Ed Frank is well remembered. Goodlette-Frank Road bears his name.

In late 1999, seven Naples residents met at the Fleischmann Community Center. They formally established the present Hungarian-American Club of S.W. Florida paying two years dues in advance to provide seed money to attract members and supporters.

Hungarian FoodOne early supporter was Count Gyula Széchényi, a Port Royal resident and the grandson of the famous Hungarian politician of the same name who served as Minister for the King of Hungary between 1900 and 1903.

The group wrote their mission statement – to preserve and promote Hungarian culture through the presentation and enjoyment of Hungarian art, music, dance, literature, history, language, and cuisine – and went to work. By 2001, the organization had grown to 58 paid memberships.

Rev. Stephan Nagy conducted a Hungarian language service in the new chapel of the First Presbyterian Church. It was the very first service held in the new facility.

Hungarian food2The Club began to hold dinners with Hungarian food and music in the Naples Depot on 10th street, the Glen Eagle Country Club and Forest Glen Country Club where the club’s first “Night in Budapest” was held.

By 2002, the Club had expanded its mission and was attracting visitors from around SW Florida to its cultural events. The Erno Kallai Orchestra was brought in from Hungary to perform along with Prima Donna Ibolya Nagy. Count Gyula Széchényi was feted with a dinner.

A commemorative program honored those heroes of the failed 1956 Hungarian Revolt who fell while fighting the Soviet Union for the return of freedom to Hungary. The Hungarian Philharmonic Orchestra visited Naples. A special project was undertaken to help support the building of a water supply system to small ethnic Hungarian villages in Transylvania neglected during Soviet occupation and by the subsequent Romanian government.

In 2005, the club joined forces with Andrew and Phyllis Evva and their American Foundation for Hungarian Youth and Culture to raise funds to build and maintain a monument to the common spirit of freedom that drove the revolutions in America and Hungary. Thanks to the diligent efforts of the Evvas and many club members, the statue, created by the artist Harrison Covington, was finished in 2006.

Originally scheduled to be placed in Freedom Park, it was given a place in the main county government complex to await the completion of the park. It was dedicated on Sunday, December 3rd, of that year in civic ceremony followed by a huge reception at Three Oaks in Estero.

Hungarian BridgeEvery October a wreath-laying ceremony is held at the site annually to honor all those who fall in the fight for freedom. In 2010, the Hungarian government awarded the Cross of Merit to five club members – Frank Dobos, Andrew Evva, Phyllis Evva, County Commissioner Donna Fiala, and County Commissioner Frank Halas – for their efforts on behalf of the Hungarian Freedom Fighters Federation.

Since its inception, the club has grown to over 250 members. These members are generous in support of local charitable drives as well as international efforts in keeping with the club’s purposes, such as relief efforts for flood victims in Hungary and support for the establishment of the Museum of the Hungarian Language in Széphalom, Hungary. The club kicked off 2015 activities with a donation of $2500 to the Freedom Memorial Foundation toward completion of the monument in Freedom Park. Dinner dances at local country clubs continue with emphasis on traditional dishes and entertainment, often brought in from Hungary or Canada. The Rajko Orchestra and the Magyar Kalman are favorites of the crowd.

All people who are interested in Hungarian culture are welcome to become members. Membership includes many local businesspeople, political figures, artisans, and professionals. The club has many 1st, 2nd and 3rd generation Hungarian members and spouses, many of whom no longer speak the “language of the angels” but want to see their heritage preserved. Events are open to the public by reservation.

Since some events are restricted by size, reservations are accepted on a first come, first served basis. Various venues are used throughout the year – dinner-dances at local country clubs, fundraisers for needy causes, religious services and luncheons at local churches, historical presentations at the main library, or picnics at local parks. The club offers at least five or six events each season (October thru April).

Let the summer get-a-ways begin!

by Catherine Fay,
Owner and VP

John and Catherine Fay

John and Catherine Fay

While life does slow down a bit once our seasonal residents leave, here at Naples Air Inc. we’re very busy helping Naples residents book flights for their summer get-a-ways.

Mountain retreats tend to be some of the favorites. Spots like the Blue Ridge Mountains and Smokey Mountains which offer relaxation and a break from Florida’s hot summer sun. In these locations, families can enjoy hiking, white water rafting, mountainclimbing, camping and fishing or spend quality time with family and friends on mountain lakes on a pontoon boat. Some travelers prefer to spend the day shopping in quaint galleries, boutiques or enjoying local restaurants.

For golfers, resorts in Georgia and the Carolinas boast some of the country’s most beautiful surroundings and wildlife. Or if fishing is your preference, the Bahamas are only a short flight away and Naples Air Inc. has US customs over-flight privileges. This means you fly direct from the Bahamas to Naples and clear US customs in Naples instead of stopping in Ft. Lauderdale to clear customs. This saves time and hassles!

Some travelers prefer laid-back Vermont which offers dozens of lakes and camps. You can visit sugarhouses to sample maple syrup delights, tour dairy barns, or stop by Ben and Jerry’s Ice Cream factory or the Vermont Teddy Bear factory. Lake Champlain is the sixth largest lake in the U.S., and the surrounding areas are filled with historical places to visit in addition to every type of water sport.

Nearby New Hampshire and Maine also attract summer visitors. For a change of pace, you may want to try Michigan or Wisconsin this summer. The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn is a favorite, or visit Silver Lakes Sand Dunes where you can rent a dune buggy.

Frankenmuth, Michigan boasts the largest Christmas store in the world and the Great Lakes offer every kind of water sport imaginable. Whatever your choice, we can fly you there.

If you have your own favorite vacation destination, call us and we will be delighted to give you an air charter quote. Our fleet includes a pressurized turbo prop and a Citation II jet that can fly you almost anywhere you’d like to vacation. Bags and pets always fly free!
Here at Naples Air Inc., we ask – “Where can we fly you today?”

Call 239.403.4838 for your tailored quote!
www.naplesairinc.com.
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How do you win the battle of the frizz?

That is a question asked often in Southwest Florida.

Erick Carter

Erick Carter

How do you win the battle of the frizz? That is a question asked often in Southwest Florida.

I think its first important to understand hair and what causes it to frizz. Most hair is made up of two layers the inner layer called the cortex and the outer layer called the cuticle, some do have a third called medulla.

The translucent cuticle layer of the hair is like shingles on a roof, which overlap each other and are on average 7-10 layers thick. The cortex of the hair is made up of two layers of protein and hair texture is determined by hydrogen, salt, and disulfide bonds.

Heat and moisture break down the salt and hydrogen bonds allowing the protein to absorb moisture. The protein chains absorbed the moisture differently, causing uneven swelling with in the cortex, which causes breaks in the cuticle. Thus adding more dryness and exposure to the cortex increasing the problem.

frizzy hairHow can products help?

Products can be applied to wet hair to help prevent frizz. I personally like to use a leave in conditioner such as Rusk Deepshine Smooth or Rusk Sensories Smooth, along with a light gel to help control the frizz such as W8less spray gel by Rusk.

Products that are applied to dry hair should help prevent the hair from absorbing moisture into the cortex layer. A silicone base product is an ideal product, silicone is design to block moisture from entering. Most popular oils today don’t have such silicones; however silicone can weigh heavy on some textures. Making argon oil, due to its many benefits, a nice alternative and/or included with a silicone product.

Along with this a proper shampoo is important, in your line of weapons to combat frizz a clarifying shampoo is important. The silicone base products can build up in your hair.( Despite popular belief clarifying shampoos are not stripping and do not remove color). Clarifying shampoo should be used once a week and before any chemical service.

How can a haircut help?

As we see curly frizzy hair desires moisture but controlled. It also desires weight, which helps pull the curl down. It is so important to remember that when looking through magazines for new haircuts. I am sure that everyone with curly hair has had it layered wrong for their hair type. Another alternative to layers is texture, it must be done cautiously, but it can be done successfully.

I would do like to invite all readers to write in your questions. You can do so by email at Erickcre8U@gmail.com or call me at 239.777.2380.