November 2014 Life In Naples Magazine

Read the November 2014 edition of Life In Naples

 

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Teaming Up for Drug Free

Deputy Chief Jorge Aguilera welcomes Drug Free Collier to their Prevention Office. Aguilera is shown here with Melanie Black, Executive Director of Drug Free Collier

Deputy Chief Jorge Aguilera welcomes Drug Free Collier to their Prevention Office. Aguilera is shown here with Melanie Black, Executive Director of Drug Free Collier

United by a common goal of reducing local drug overdose calls, the North Naples Fire Control and Rescue District and Drug Free Collier are capitalizing on their new
partnership to improve outcomes. With a new satellite office recently approved by the NNFD, Drug Free Collier will work alongside responders and provide valuable resources to advance their shared mission to save lives.

Drug Free Collier and the NNFD recognize that prevention is vital. “By teaming up, we hope to educate each other about current drug use in our community,” said Melanie Black, Executive Director of Drug Free Collier. “We want to stay ahead of potential threats and not wait until it’s too late. By making parents aware of possible trends, young lives could be saved,” she added.

Last year, NNFD responded to 35 drug overdose calls, with more than one third involving children. That number is expected to increase based on overdose calls to-date within the district. Tracking this kind of data will clearly help local prevention partners work on solutions. By collaborating with multiple sectors in the community, Drug Free Collier tracks data, identifies trends, and develops strategies to reduce teen substance abuse in Collier County.

With up-to-date information, Drug Free Collier recently alerted first responders about an emerging local threat known as “dabbing.”

nnfd logoHighly potent concentrates of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) are being extracted from marijuana by young users with butane canisters and blow torches. This twist on an old drug creates new and serious risks for both the user and the community at-large. “Our major concern is that they are using something that is explosive and very flammable,” said Jorge Aguilera, Deputy Chief of the NNFD. Earlier this year, an explosion in a residential neighborhood in Boca Raton was linked to making this drug.

For first responders who are on emergency calls, this information could prove invaluable.

“We want parents to be aware as greater access to marijuana continues to be a concern,” she added. “In states with legalized marijuana or medical marijuana these incidents appear to be increasing,” Black said. Dabbing is also known as BHO or wax.

“This partnership is in line with our Department’s mission of providing a healthier and safer community”, said Orly Stolts, Fire Chief. “We are excited about our partnership and look forward to building a stronger relationship with positive results for the better of this community,” Chief Stolts added.

“With help from key partners, like the North Naples Fire Department, we are making a difference,” said Black. “Finding common ground is critical to helping us find solutions.” “We cannot do this alone and we are extremely grateful for this generous support,” she added.

By opening a satellite office at the NNFD, Drug Free Collier will be able to provide greater access to community members, parents and others who are looking for resources to protect children from substance abuse. This project will better meet the growing needs of our community and allow Drug Free Collier to more effectively collaborate with key partners. Additional outcomes include the ability of Drug Free Collier to engage new volunteers, interns and community partners to work on solutions for preventing teen substance abuse.

Drug Free Collier’s satellite office will be located at 6495 Taylor Road with the NNFD Fire Prevention Bureau.

To join our prevention efforts or to learn more, please contact Drug Free Collier by phone at 239.377.0535 or NNFD, Jorge Aguilera, Deputy Chief at 239.597.3222.

59th Annual Farm City BBQ

farm-city-bbq-logoBusiness and agricultural leaders prepare to celebrate what has become known as a favorite Thanksgiving tradition in Collier County.

Fifty-nine years ago, the national Farm City Council was formed in an effort to help bring together business and agricultural communities. Their goal was to help show the interdependence of a vibrant network of farmers helping support the economy and provide the basic essentials that every business owner needs. From the truck driver, to the rancher, to the grocery store clerk, to the futures broker and the biotechnologies, we all play an important role in making sure that Americans have access to a healthy and abundant supply of food, fiber, and natural resources.

BBQIn Collier County, the Farm City BBQ was formed in a similar way. The old timers remember when Collier County’s farmers had a bad year of crops. The business leaders reached out to the farmers, inviting them for a BBQ and sharing in the little produce that was available so that their families wouldn’t go hungry on Thanksgiving Day. A year later, the farming community wanted to reciprocate the hospitality so they invited the business leaders for a BBQ in the “country”.

Mayor John Sorey, Supervisor of Elections Jennifer Edwards and State Attorney Stephen Russell

Mayor John Sorey, Supervisor of Elections Jennifer Edwards and State Attorney Stephen Russell

As the years have passed, the farming practices have evolved to meet the growing demands of our nation. They have become more high-tech and interdependent with the
business community, that also continues to grow in Naples. But, the relationships still run deep at the Farm City BBQ where there are no suits or formal titles, just good friends that you greet with a hug.

“With technology, we are more plugged in than ever and yet more separated. The Farm City BBQ helps connect us in the most important way – through a handshake and
a hug with an old friend,” said Stephanie Kissinger, 2014 Farm City BBQ Chair.

Over the past decade, the Farm City BBQ has grown from 600 guests to over 2,100 guests who share in the traditional steak and Immokalee Salad. And while the roots of the Farm City BBQ are about developing those relationships, the organization has grown to support future leaders in our community through four non-profit organizations.

School Board Members Pat Carroll, Roy Terry and Barbara Berry

School Board Members Pat Carroll, Roy Terry and Barbara  Berry

In recent years, more than $200,000 has been donated back into our community through the Collier County 4H Foundation, Youth Leadership Collier, Collier County Junior Deputy League, as well as the Collier chapters of Key Club International. Funds have helped support the progress of these organizations in providing hands-on classroom education from elementary through high school students. Additionally, a portion of the proceeds have helped kick-start the development of the Junior Deputy’s Camp Discovery and well as providing scholarships for sending emerging leaders to the Key Club District Leadership and Education Conference.

When you go, you can look forward to a sizzling hot steak, corn, and baked beans served by our local elected officials. Bring some extra money to participate in the raffle of
prizes donated from area businesses including a grand prize – the Big Green Egg Grill!

Date: Wednesday, November 26th
Time: 11:30am-2:00pm
Location: Collier County Fairgrounds
Cost: Tickets are $20.00 and include a steak
dinner, Immokalee Salad, corn, baked beans and
complimentary beer, wine and sodas
Tickets are available on www.FarmCityBBQ.com

Proceeds benefit the:
• Collier County 4H Foundation
• Youth Leadership Collier
• The Collier County Junior Deputy League
• Key Club International
If you go, look like a regular.
• Proper attire are Cowboy Boots, blue jeans and
your best Cowboy Hat.
• Buy your Veggie Bag early – as they often sell out.
• Bring a friend to share in the best Thanksgiving
Tradition in Collier County!

The Right Smart Phone for You?

smart phoneWhat exactly is the difference between a cell phone and a smartphone? The smartphone does not have a brain, though some can speak, and there are several other
differences that may be important when deciding on your next phone. Here are some things a regular cell phone can do: make phone calls, take photos and send and receive text messages. A smartphone can do all of these things, as well as easily access the internet, provide GPS services, shoot high resolution photos and videos, accept voice commands and run thousands of programs, called Apps, that do everything from identifying bird calls to ordering pizza with a click.

If you often have a lot of downtime when you’re in public, a smartphone can help you pass the time. Ask anyone who has lost hours of their life playing Angry Birds or Words with Friends, a smartphone can be a great diversion.

With the right smartphone you can manage e-mails and appointments, get directions, keep track of your workouts and what you eat, take your pulse, shop, share information with friends, listen to music and watch movies. Sound like a pocket computer? It is. The iPhone of today has more processing power than the first lunar lander, Apollo 11. Today’s smartphones can now translate languages and speak the results… while you are making a phone call!

DECIDING ON THE SMARTPHONE THAT IS RIGHT FOR YOU

smart phone pickerMake a list of all the things you want your phone to do. Do you want it only for music and videos? Do you need it for text messaging? Do you need to keep in contact with family or coworkers? How much will you be using it during a typical day? Where will you be using it? Getting a smartphone often means having immediate access to
work e-mails, social media and the Web. Not everyone wants to be that connected.

Smartphones are not cheap, so do your homework before deciding on the one you want. Go to different service providers and ask questions. How much does the device cost? What are the monthly fees involved? Do I need a separate data plan for it?

Are nights and weekends free? How many text messages do I get per month with my plan? How long does the battery last during normal use? How much memory does it come with? Can I add more memory? Is the screen big enough for what I want to use it for? Being informed makes you a better shopper.

Next, look at the device and ask for a demo. Think about the tasks your planning on using your phone for, and try them out on the demonstration phones in the store. See if the key board is comfortable, and how easy it is to switch between applications.

Make sure that the device fits comfortably in your hand. Are the keys spaced far enough apart for your fingers for typing? Does the device feel good? Don’t just go with looks. This will become a device you will likely be using a lot, so make sure it fits you.

Also, ask the service provider what their return policy is. Can you return the device in a few days if it doesn’t suit my needs? Most providers have 7 or 14 day return policies, and be sure to get their policy in writing if it is not on the receipt.

PICKING A SERVICE PROVIDER

When you’re deciding how much to spend on a smartphonehave two costs to consider: the price of the phone and the of the plan. The price of the phone is a one-time expense. Cell phone companies also tend to offer lots of promotions and so the phone you want may be cheaper than you think. In some cases, if you sign up for a certain plan, the phone is free. Before setting your heart on a certain phone, make sure its price is in-line with your budget.

If you plan using mainly it for talking and texting, with only a little bit of e-mail or web surfing, see if you can find a plan with less data. If you’re constantly online and want to download apps, games and movies, you’ll want to pick a plan with more data.

To find the right cell phone company, check out which company has the best coverage where you live. Verizon Wireless, AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile are the four major carriers in the U.S., and each has areas in the country where they have better coverage than others. Having a great smartphone is useless if you can’t connect to the Web or are constantly dropping calls.

Look at the coverage maps available at any cell phone carrier’s website. Smartphones tend to work best on the faster 4G and LTE networks. You should also make sure coverage is good in areas where you frequently travel.

PICKING AN OPERATING SYSTEM (OS)

For many people, picking the right smartphone is a matter of picking the right operating system. The smartphone’s operating system is the software platform it uses to run various programs. While they can all pretty much connect you to the Web, e-mail, phone calls and texts, each has its own strengths and weaknesses.

There are three dominant smartphone platforms on the market today: Apple’s iOS, Google’s Android, and Microsoft’s Windows Phone. While iOS and Android are by far the most popular options, Windows Phone is growing slowly but steadily. Choosing an operating system might be the most important decision you make when it comes to actually buying your smartphone — it’s what you’ll be interacting with for hours every day. All three have matured enough to provide fast, responsive, and generally reliable
performance on the current crop of smartphones. The decision you make, then, is no longer tied to if one platform is faster than another, but rather aesthetic appeal, which apps and services are most important to you, and what kind of hardware you want.

When you have the new phone, learn the features of it. Play with it! You cannot easily hurt a phone unless you throw it, so don’t worry about clicking the wrong button. Clicks can be undone. And protect it with a good case, as there will come a day when you want to throw it!

JEFF BOHR
NAPLES MAC HELP
239.595.0482 | JEFF@NAPLESMACHELP.COM

United Way Sets Ambitious Campaign Goal

United Way Campaign Kickoff

UNITED WAY OF COLLIER COUNTY PRESIDENT AND CEO STEVE SANDERSON HONORED THIS YEAR’S CORPORATE PACESETTERS AND PARTNER AGENCY PACESETTERS AT THE ORGANIZATION’S CAMPAIGN KICKOFF BREAKFAST AT HILTON NAPLES ON SEPTEMBER 24.

United Way of Collier County’s Community Campaign is off to a strong start, with its Pacesetter Campaigns and early special events bringing in over 40 percent of its $2.75 million goal. Funds raised during the campaign help United Way support over 100,000 Collier County citizens in need every year.

The coming months of the campaign are crucial to its overall success. The United Way encourages everyone to get involved, either as part of an organization or individually.
Businesses can participate in many different ways: running an employee campaign, giving a corporate gift, matching employee gifts, donating a portion of proceeds from sales, allowing employees to participate in Days of Caring, or conducting special fundraising events.

Tom Donahue United Way

Tom Donahue

Tom Donahue, United Way Campaign Chair and General Manager of Shula’s Steak House, encourages everyone to participate. He stresses that “Every contribution, no matter how large or small, helps us support the important, life changing work of our partner agencies. These contributions also help United Way fund its own programs for
those in need in our community. We look forward to a highly successful campaign!”

With a series of events in September, United Way has kicked off the campaign in style.

THE CAMPAIGN KICKOFF BREAKFAST AT HILTON NAPLES

At the Campaign Kickoff Breakfast and Pacesetter Recognition on September 24 at Hilton Naples, Donahue announced the $2.75 million campaign goal for 2014-15 and thanked this year’s seven Corporate Pacesetters and 16 United Way Partner Agency Pacesetters. Pacesetters complete their workplace campaigns early and lead the way for others to support the United Way’s efforts. Because of the work of these organizations, pledges and donations to this year’s campaign already totaled $1,201,293, or 43 percent of the goal, on the day of the announcement.

CHARLIE BABB AND LARRY BALL SIGNED AUTOGRAPHS FOR DOZENS OF FANS AT THE CELEBRITY BARTENDER EVENT AT HILTON NAPLES, TO BENEFIT UNITED WAY OF COLLIER COUNTY.

CHARLIE BABB AND LARRY BALL SIGNED AUTOGRAPHS FOR DOZENS OF FANS AT THE CELEBRITY BARTENDER EVENT AT HILTON NAPLES, TO BENEFIT UNITED WAY OF COLLIER COUNTY.

CELEBRITY BARTENDER EVENT AT HILTON NAPLES

Two days after the Campaign Kickoff Breakfast, Shula’s Steak House and Hilton Naples hosted the 4th Annual Celebrity Bartender Event to benefit United Way of Collier County. Retired Miami Dolphins Charlie Babb, Larry Ball, Mercury Morris, and Larry Little – all members of the widely-celebrated undefeated 1972 Super Bowl championship team – spent the evening socializing with enthusiastic fans, signing autographs, and posing for photos.

WALK FOR THE WAY, RUN FOR THE WAY 5K AND COMMUNITY RESOURCE FAIR

The 9th Annual Walk for the Way at North Collier Regional Park on September 27 exemplified what United Way represents: businesses, charities, and individuals working together for the common good.

MEMBERS OF THE COLLIER COUNTY GOVERNMENT WALK FOR THE WAY TEAM ENJOYING A WONDERFUL MORNING AT NORTH COLLIER REGIONAL PARK. COLLIER COUNTY GOVERNMENT HAD THE LARGEST TEAM AT THE EVENT, WITH A TOTAL OF 120 MEMBERS!

MEMBERS OF THE COLLIER COUNTY GOVERNMENT WALK FOR THE WAY TEAM ENJOYING A WONDERFUL MORNING AT NORTH COLLIER REGIONAL PARK. COLLIER COUNTY GOVERNMENT HAD THE LARGEST TEAM AT THE EVENT, WITH A TOTAL OF
120 MEMBERS!

More than 2000 individuals participated in the Walk, many as members of the 49 registered teams. Steve Sanderson, President and CEO of United Way of Collier County, was thrilled with the results of both the Walk and the brand new event that preceded it, the Run for the Way 5K. More than 200 runners participated in the inaugural 5K. The Walk and the 5K combined brought in more than $20,000 for this year’s campaign.

Sanderson also noted that “The Community Resource Fair, which, after the Walk, showcases our Partner Agencies, was the best I’ve seen! The agency booths
included engaging and fun activities, and the attendees had a wonderful time.”

For information about how to give or how to get involved in the campaign as an individual or organization, visit www.uwcollier.org or call 239. 261.7112.

Merger, Fact Versus Fiction

by Jorge Aguilera, Deputy Chief EMS
North Naples Fire Control & Rescue District

As we approach the November 4th vote on the consolidation/merger of the North Naples Fire Control & Rescue District (“NNFD”) and the Big Corkscrew Island Fire Control & Rescue District (“BCIFR”), I continue to have the distinct pleasure of meeting and discussing the issues with residents of both districts. I believe it is my responsibility as the Fire Chief to ensure our taxpayers have the factual information necessary to make an independent and informed decision on this very important issue.

After several months of the public vetting process, it has become clear that there is some misinformation which has been disseminated regarding the consolidation/merger of NNFD and BCIFR. I think it is important to take this opportunity to identify what is fact and what is fiction:

  1. Fiction: If the merger occurs, the NNFD tax rate for fire service will increase from 1 mil to 1.5 mils, or even higher. Fact: An increase in the maximum tax rate for NNFD (1 mil) is EXPRESSLY PROHIBITED without a separate vote of the taxpayers of just NNFD. In fact, the merger plan calls for a reduction in the NNFD tax rate to .95 mils during the first 5 years of merger, and the NNFD Board adopted that lower millage rate of .95 for the 2014-2015 fiscal year.
  2. Fiction: NNFD tax money will be spent in BCIFR; NNFDwill be a “donor district”.Fact: NNFD tax money will NOT be spent in BCIFR. By usinga cost allocation method, the finances of each district will be trackedand maintained separately to ensure one district is not funding a tax reduction in the other, or one district is not subsidizing the other. Thiscost allocation method will be required by the newly merged district’s enabling act.
  3. Fiction: Service level will be decreased in NNFD; NNFDresources will be moved out to BCIFR. Fact: Service level will be increased in BOTH NNFD andBCIFR. In just the first five years, an estimated $2.3 million will besaved and reinvested into more firefighters and more quick responseunits in both districts.
  4. Fiction: BCIFR is going broke and NNFD will have to support them. Fact: BCIFR is NOT going broke. Not once in the 20 yearfinancial projections (which are very conservative) does BCIFR ever deplete their reserves. In fact, BCIFR used $303,000 LESS inreserves than planned in the 2013-2014 fiscal year.

This is one of the most important decisions the residents of NNFD and BCIFR have to make in reference to the provision of fire and rescue service. As Fire Chief, I feel it is my duty to provide access to all the information necessary to make an informed decision. This information is available electronically through our merger website at bcnnmerger.com, or in print at any NNFD or BCIFR station. We would love the opportunity to meet with you or your group. Please contact my office at 239.597.3222 to make arrangements.

REMEMBER, YOUR VOTE MATTERS; VOTE NOVEMBER 4th , 2014

TIF Student Continues Journey to Success

by Steven Kissinger

John and Kate Henry, Jesus Velasco, Elisa Velasco and Manny Touron at 2013 TSIC graduation ceremony

John and Kate Henry, Jesus Velasco, Elisa Velasco and Manny Touron at 2013 TSIC graduation ceremony

Like many students involved in The Immokalee Foundation and its programs, Jesus Velazco has had his fair share of challenges. He struggled to learn the English language after coming to Immokalee from his native Mexico, and school was difficult as a result. But, Velazco was determined to build a better future for himself.

By the time he was in fourth grade, his grades had improved and he discovered a love of soccer. He also met a man that would change his life: Manny Touron, a former principal at Lake Trafford Elementary, Immokalee Middle and Immokalee High schools, and a TIF mentor.

Touron said from the moment he met Jesus, he recognized something special, “There was always a sense of maturity and great leadership qualities. Jesus was always
the first person at practice and the last to leave. The kids looked up to him for direction. I knew big things were coming for him.”

He was right. As a freshman, Velazco entered the foundation’s Take Stock in Children program, a scholarship and mentoring program that provides students with the opportunity to attend four years of college tuition free if they earn good grades, exhibit good behavior and meet weekly with a mentor. Although Velazco didn’t know
it at the time, his involvement with TIF, and the people he would meet along the way, would help pave his path toward achieving his dreams.

John Henry, a TIF board member and mentor, met Velazco before he entered TSIC his freshman year. Thanks to Touron, “Manny knew I was involved in the Take Stock in Children program so he called me. He told me he had a guy I needed to interview; a remarkable young man and we should give him a shot.”

Henry agreed to the interview. That year, TIF accepted 25 kids into the program and Velazco was one of them. The TSIC scholarship made him realize that if he worked hard, he could go to college. It changed everything.

In 2011, he attended a summer camp experience in Maine thanks to TIF’s Charity Classic Celebration Fund A Dream. The owners of the camp called Velazco “extraordinary” and invited him back the next year to attend an exclusive teen leadership camp in Canada.

It was easy to see the exceptional young man Velazco was becoming. He continued playing soccer, played football and was near the top of his class. “Jesus wanted to lead a purposeful life and he was already doing so as a young student,” said Henry. “He was impressive.”

TIF LogoWhen he graduated from Immokalee High School, his accolades seemed endless, but one in particular stood out. He was awarded the prestigious Gates Millennium Scholarship, funded by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Each year only 1,000 students are selected to receive a good-throughgraduation scholarship to use at any college or university of their choice.

Prior to starting college, with the help of Henry, Touron and J. Richard “Dick” Monro, former chairman and CEO of Time Warner Inc., Velazco spent a year at Salisbury School, an all-boys, private college-preparatory boarding school located in Salisbury, Connecticut.

It came as no surprise to anyone that while at Salisbury, Velazco served as an inspiration to the students of his class and won an award for top student. “Jesus is an extraordinary presence,” said Henry. “He is purposeful with a wonderful sense of humor, yet serious about his studies and his mission in life.”

Joe Zednik, chairman of the TIF board, says Velazco serves as a tremendous role model for TIF students, “This is what it’s all about for us. Jesus is a remarkable example that if you work hard, stay drug free and trouble free, you can achieve your goals.”

Next up for Velazco is Colgate University in New York, where he just began his freshman year. “When Jesus visited Colgate, he felt it was the place for him,” added Zednik. “He liked it and he was comfortable. This is simply a continuation of his very exciting journey and we couldn’t be prouder.”

The Immokalee Foundation provides a range of education programs that focus on building pathways to success through college and postsecondary preparation and support, mentoring and tutoring, opportunities for broadening experiences and life skills development leading to economic independence. To learn more about TIF, volunteering
as a mentor or for additional information, call 239.430.9122 or visit www.immokaleefoundation.org.

Steven Kissinger, executive director of The Immokalee Foundation, can be reached at steven.kissinger@imokaleefoundation.com.

Hodges Dedicates Classroom to Local Businessman

PICTURED L-R: PHIL MEMOLI, VP OF UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT; TOM HORTON; DR. JEANETTE BROCK, HODGES UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT.

PICTURED L-R: PHIL MEMOLI, VP OF UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT; TOM HORTON;
DR. JEANETTE BROCK, HODGES UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT.

In recognition of his many years of support, Hodges University has dedicated a classroom in honor of local businessman Tom Horton and his late wife Laura. The classroom is located on the University’s Fort Myers campus.

Mr. Horton, founder and former CEO of Palm Printing Solutions of Fort Myers, recently served as honorary chair for the Hodges’ Tenth Annual Spring Golf Classic. The event, held at Fiddlesticks Country Club in Fort Myers, raised over $75,000 in scholarship support for student veterans and other deserving students.

“Tom has been a great friend and supporter of our institution for many years,” said Phil Memoli, Vice President of University Advancement. “He was responsible for organizing our first golf tournament and actually chaired it for the first two years. For our tenth anniversary, we were honored to have him serve as honorary chair, and it is in this spirit that we have decided to dedicate a classroom in his honor.”

To date, nearly $500,000 has been raised to provide scholarships for deserving students. Many of these students include military veterans who have valiantly served in Iraq and Afghanistan. These students are working to make the difficult and arduous transition from military to civilian life. Currently, over 250 students at Hodges are veterans.

“It feels especially good to be part of an event that gives back to our military. Hodges has treated our returning veterans very well and it feels good to be connected with a school that has done so much for our military.” A veteran himself, Mr. Horton served as a pilot in the Marine Corp for six years.

Memoli also commented on the importance of scholarships for Hodges students. “Supporting these students is an investment in our community, to assure the skilled workforce we need to drive the economic development of our community,” he said. “Hodges University students live, work and raise their families here. Their ambition and determination to seek advanced degrees is vital to serving the current and future needs of our citizens.”

The majority of Hodges University’s approximately 2,500 students are adult learners who are tasked with maintaining families and fulltime jobs. For these students, Hodges provides a curriculum designed to complement, not complicate, their busy lives. Small, but rigorous classes, flexible scheduling, online learning, individual attention from a dedicated administration and faculty, and access to a state-of-theart library, each are among the attributes that culminate into everyday rewards experienced by students at Hodges University.

Abstract Versus Non-Objective Art

Juliana and Kristine Meekby Juliana Meek and Kristine Meek

Dear Artspert:

My neighbor and I were talking on our morning walk about contemporary art and we can’t agree on whether there is a difference between ‘abstract art’ and ‘non-objective art’. Can you help explain the difference, if there is one?
Signed,

Objectively Abstract

Non objective painting

EXAMPLE OF A COMPLETED ABSTRACT PAINTING ALL IN THE FAMILY BY PHILIP MORSBERGER OIL ON CANVAS 20” x 16” 2009-12

Dear Objectively,

You and your neighbor are not alone in your confusion over the terms abstract and nonobjective art. It’s a common mistake to think all abstract art is non-objective. Essentially the difference is abstract art defines art that distorts the actual representation of something, for instance Cubism is a type of Abstract Art where any subject such as a woman’s body will be distorted into geometric shapes. Non-objective, also called nonrepresentational, art defines art that does not represent or depict any identifiable
person, place or thing. The content of the work is its color, shapes, brushstrokes, size and scale. Color-field painting (think Mark Rothko) is an example of nonobjective
art.

One artist represented by our Gallery, Philip Morsberger, paints in both non-objective and abstract art styles. Each of Morsberger’s paintings begins as a completed non-objective painting of varying colors and shapes. After his non-objective painting is complete he contemplates the completed work. After musing on the work, he will begin to see images from his memory and his imagination form out of the shapes and colors of his non-objective painting.

Non objective painting2

EXAMPLE OF A COMPLETED NON-OBJECTIVE PAINTING EMERGENCE BY PHILIP MORSBERGER OIL ON CANVAS 69” x 35” 1992-2002

This is similar to seeing clouds in the sky. He then paints over the non-objective painting, with abstract images, objects, and words. Most of his paintings take him many years to complete because he will return to a painting as he sees more figures within the abstract shapes and colors. Sometimes as in one of the examples here, he keeps a particular work a non-objective painting of color and shape.

Can a non-objective painting also be called abstract art? Yes. Is all abstract art non-objective? No. Both examples of paintings by Morsberger can be classified as abstract but only the painting without an identifiable subject can be called non-objective or non-representational art.
Sincerely,

The Artsperts